Courses Offered in Spring 2022 | Freshman Seminar Program

Courses Offered in Spring 2022

These seminars are open only to students who will be freshmen in the spring 2021 semester. For the most current information including location of the class, see UNCGenie on the web: www.uncg.edu. (TBA means To Be Announced) We encourage students not to sign up for a seminar without first reading the course description and not to sign up for more than one seminar.  Talk with your advisor about registering for a seminar.

 

Reasoning and Discourse: Written Communication

Also carries credit equivalent to ENG 101. You may not receive credit for both FMS 115 and ENG 101.

What Is Cli(mate)-Fi(ction)

Instructor: Evan Fackler

If all contemporary fiction is climate fiction, then what exactly is cli-fi? This course will examine some of the ways writers of literary and speculative fictions from around the world, as well as poetry and prose-nonfiction, engage with climate change: from (re)imagining the future to retelling the past to coming to terms with the present. Over the course of the semester, students will read a selection of short stories, novels, poetry, and films, as well as excerpts from the latest IPCC findings and other general audience texts on climate change.

  • FMS 115-01
  • M, W, F | 11:00 - 11:50 AM
  • MAC: Written Communication

What Is Cli(mate)-Fi(ction)

Instructor: Evan Fackler

If all contemporary fiction is climate fiction, then what exactly is cli-fi? This course will examine some of the ways writers of literary and speculative fictions from around the world, as well as poetry and prose-nonfiction, engage with climate change: from (re)imagining the future to retelling the past to coming to terms with the present. Over the course of the semester, students will read a selection of short stories, novels, poetry, and films, as well as excerpts from the latest IPCC findings and other general audience texts on climate change.

  • FMS 115-02
  • M, W, F | 12:00 - 12:50 PM
  • MAC: Written Communication

Lies the Internet Told Me… And How I Fought Back.

Instructor: Joseph Ross

The average American adult spends 24 hours a week on the Internet, but one in four is online almost constantly. While the web contains helpful information, allows us to connect with people around the world, and gives more of us a voice in public conversations, it is also littered with garbage: misleading and sensationalized headlines, clickbait, and downright falsehoods. Most of us think we can tell facts from fiction, but all of us have been fooled at one time or another in this age of information overload. This is why we need to practice navigating digital information, fact-checking claims on social media, evaluating evidence, and responsibly determining whom to trust. We need to fight back against the lies, and this course will show you how.

  • FMS 115-05
  • M, W, F | 9:00 - 9:50 AM
  • MAC: Written Communication

Reasoning and Discourse: Oral Communication

I’ve Got the Power!

Instructor: Eleanor L. Cowen

You communicate to the world about who you are in every aspect of your interactions. This class will help you identify and shape the intentional and unconscious messages you send to yourself and others, critically evaluate the dynamics of human communication, and take control of who you want to be. You have the power.

  • FMS 116-01
  • M, W | 3:30 - 4:45 PM
  • MAC: Oral Communication

A World of Marvels

Instructor: Gabriel Cruz

Popular media in general, and superhero narratives in particular, have always served as ways to explore social issues, historic events, and the politics of the time. This course prompts students to critically engage with sequential art and superhero narratives by examining content that is rooted in real world issues that are represented in these stories. Students will then develop their research and oratory skills by researching these topics and delivering extemporaneous speeches on the selected subject matter, connecting our world, theory, and the narratives

  • FMS 116-02
  • T, TH | 9:30 - 10:45 AM
  • MAC: Oral Communication

Literature


Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical Principles

Videogaming and Death

Instructor: John W. Borchert

Death has always been a part of videogames: a way of dividing up playtime, effort, and accomplishment. This course examines a range of relationships between videogaming and death – from what dying repeatedly in games can tell us about play, failure, and overcoming adversity to how games help us grieve and make sense of death in our everyday lives. Through a combination of reading about and playing games this course offers a theoretical and hands-on approach to studying videogaming as an academic pursuit and what that can teach us about death and dying.

  • FMS 140-01
  • M, W | 3:30 - 4:45 PM
  • MAC: Critical Thinking and Inquiry Humanities and Fine Arts

Historical Perspectives


Social and Behavioral Studies

War and Conflict

Instructor: Leigh Sink

It has been estimated that there has been a war somewhere in the world 94% of the time since the dawn of civilization. Why does mankind periodically organize himself for armed conflict and warfare? This course will begin by asking these questions and try to answer them through an examination of the United States’ involvement in war and conflict over the last hundred years.

  • FMS 170-01
  • T, TH | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
  • MAC: Critical Thinking and Inquiry in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

Natural Sciences

Advances in Genetics: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.

Instructor: Cristina Moreira

Meet Helen Obando, a Hispanic 16-year-old who is now featured in a new TV series from The New York Times because she is the youngest person in the U.S. to have her DNA reset in an attempt to cure her sickle cell disease, a genetic blood disorder that can cause strokes, organ damage and intense pain. Gene therapies in general are advancing and CRISPR/cas 9 has been used in different laboratories in the US and abroad. In August 2017 scientists fixed a heart disease mutation in human embryos using CRISPR/cas 9. A little more than one year later, a Chinese scientist claimed that he created the world’s first genetically edited babies using the same method. Now we know that there are consequences of using CRISPR/cas9. The reality presented in the 1997 sci-fi movie GATTACA is no longer distant from our current lives and more than ever Genetics advancements have social, ethical and political consequences. What are the consequences for your identity? Do you really know who you are: are you familiar with genetic tests as 23andme? How much do you want to know? How much do you want others to know about your genetic profile? While most Americans are optimistic about the use of genetic information to improve health, many are concerned that genetic information may be used by insurers and employers to deny, limit or cancel their health insurance and to discriminate against them in the workplace. How has genetics changed the food you eat? Are you familiar with the science behind genetically modified foods and how countries see them differently? Did you know that your food has always been genetically modified? In this course we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a new era where genetics information is part of our daily lives and may drastically change the choices you make and how they will impact your life.

  • FMS 183-01
  • T, TH | 2:00 - 3:15 PM
  • MAC: Critical Thinking and Inquiry in the Natural Sciences